Chess Edinburgh lewischessmen2-75h 

Chandler Cornered

Defosse + Heather's Book + The Secret of Chess




Today we meet 'Defosse.' who has two games in '1000 Miniatures' by Chernev.

I did a wee search on the net to see if I could find some more info on 'Defosse.'

He be could a Marcel Defosse, that was an alias of Dennis (or Denis) Marion.
But that is about all I could get so I'm not sure if it's the same 'Defosse'.

Anyway. Who cares. Let's see the games. 'Defosse' loses both games in a very
instructive manner involving the games Blues Trio, The Rook, the Knight and the Bishop.

(The Blues Trio?..............ED)

Rook, Knight & Bishop = R 'N' B. 'Rhythm and Blues' gedditt?

(good grief..........Ed)

Here is Defosse, White (to play) v Franck. Brussels, 1942.










Taking the Queen allows Black to mate in two.
13.gxh4 Rg6+ 14.Kh1 Nxf2 mate.

He spotted that one but took the Queen next move
leaving Black to find a longer and neater mate.

The Black opening is the 1942 equivalent of the 150 attack.
This attack in the Queens Indian still works today in minor sections all over the planet.

The rot started with 8.a3 forcing Black to play a move he was going to play anyway.
The damage was done with the 12.g3? If you look carefully at the b7 Bishop you
can clearly see him grinning like a Cheshire Cat.



[Click here to replay the game]
Defosse - Franck

1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e6 3.Nf3 b6 4.Nc3 Bb4 5.Qc2 Bb7 6.e3 Ne4 7.Bd3 f5 8.a3 Bxc3+ 9.bxc3 0-0 10.0-0 Rf6 11.Nd2 Rh6 12.g3 Qh4 13.Nf3 Ng5 14.gxh4 Nxf3+ 15.Kg2 Ne1+ 16.Kg3 Rg6+ 17.Kf4 Rg4+ 18.Ke5 Nf3


and the next one: Soultanbeieff - Defosse, Correspondence 1941

Say hello to the most instantly recognised mating pattern in chess history.










No solution needed there.

What about this one? White to play and mate.










How long did that take you? It's Philidors '3 piece' Legacy.

1.Ne5+ Kh8 2.Ng6+ hxg6 3.Rh4 mate.

This cropped up in the game. White went for it on move 16 buying time
to centralise the Rook by offering the b-pawn.

Black took the b-pawn and then saw his Knight was trapped.
This is called 'thinking after the move' and is best avoided.
Most good chess players think before making their move.

Everyone has heard that Knights on the rim are dim.
Knights on b2 be can be dim too.
(you can make up your own pet sayings for g2,b7 and g7)
A Rook can snag a Knight on the fianchetto squares thus:










Black fired off 18...a5 to try to free the Knight and White
hit back with the three piece mate.

Look out for White's alert pawn nab. 14.Nxe6! if 14...fxe6 15.Bxe6+ and 16.Bxd7.


[Click here to replay the game]
Soultanbeieff - Defosse

1.d4 d5 2.c4 dxc4 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Nc3 e6 5.Qa4+ Nbd7 6.Bg5 c5 7.e4 cxd4 8.Nxd4 Be7 9.Rd1 Nxe4 10.Nxe4 Bxg5 11.Bxc4 Qe7 12.Nxg5 Qxg5 13.0-0 0-0 14.Nxe6 Nb6 15.Nxg5 Nxa4 16.Rd4 Nxb2 17.Bxf7+ Kh8 18.Bb3 a5 19.Nf7+ Kg8 20.Ne5+ Kh8 21.Ng6+ hxg6 22.Rh4


We now leave Defosse and thank him for kindly for the lesson.




The Scottish International player. Heather Lang denies writing this
but the coincidences are, shall we say, quite alarming.

The Story:
Heather visits her Grandad who is very sad because he was cheated
out of the 1930 British Chess Championship by Baron Ruston.

She decides to teach herself Chess and win the British Championship
for her Grandad. She buys a chess book and falls in love with the
picture of the author, Jeff Chalmers, on the back cover.

Hmmmm....this is a bit too close to a book I wrote in 1979.



Anyway, Heather enters the British and hacks her way to the semi-final.
The book has the British Championship being a knock-out tournament.
On the way she has beaten Richard Pallister, Mark Hepburn, David Powell, Adam Michaels.

In the semi's are Jeff Chalmers, O'Keith Ruston, Heather and Ray Kane OBE.

All through the book Heather has been trying to get close to Jeff
and whilst he was outside signing autographs she sat next to his jacket,

"just to be close something that he wore...."

Well she sees Ruston (the grandson of Baron Ruston) put something into his jacket pocket.

The games start and ten minutes later a mobile phone goes off.
It is discovered in Jeff's pocket, he knows nothing about it.
Jeff losses the game by default.

Heather's wins her game v Ray Kane OBE when he suddenly had to
leave the country and has not been seen since. (she never realy explains why).

Heather gets her only chess book and asks Jeff to sign it.
That will be this one - plug:



She tells him about Ruston and he walks with her to Moondog Cliff.

"Ruston plays the Sicilian, I don't know what to do?"

"Jeff suddenly took me in his strong bronzed arms and gently kissed me.
My heart swam with joy, I had dreamed of this moment since I had first
seen Jeff's picture on the back of my chess book.
"

Plug:



Jeff softly whispered in my ear. "The Morra Gambit".

So Heather plays the Morra Gambit, beats Ruston, get married to Jeff
and has three kids: Vera, Chuck and Dave.

A good book. Recommended.

OK that was a wee joke.
But our Heather has written a book.

Heather's Proper Book

And if you click on Heather's name you will see where the idea for this sketch
came from. (The other Heather is NOT our Heather).



Busy Doing Nothing.........


Good Chess players do that. Nothing.

It's how they win games against weaker players. They simply make moves
waiting for their opponent to think of something and then react against it.

It's is a strange fact that the first player to think of something to do usually loses.
Ideas break the balance of the position. They upset the stability, the rhythm.
So here is the plan next time you sit down at the board....DO NOTHING.

Look at this game. Black does nothing but develop, take material and play forced moves.

Susan Lalic - Keith Arkell, British Championship.Torquay 1998

1.e4 c6










A nice start. You won't get too ambitious with the Caro Khan.

2.d4 d5 3.Nd2 dxe4










Black sucks the Knight onto e4 where White will get ideas.
Remember this is what we want. Our opponent to think of something.

4.Nxe4 Nd7 5.Nf3 Ngf6 6.Nxf6+ Nxf6 7.Ne5










Oh happiness we have succeeded in getting a Knight from e4 to e5.
White is bound to think of something soon.
Black now develops a piece ready to react to anything White does.

8...Bf5 8.Bc4 e6 9.g4










And now it happens, White is doing things.
Black could play 9...Be5 here but that would be doing something.
The less Black does the better his position becomes.

9....Bg6 10.h4










White has now taken on the responsibility of looking after
these pawns and covering the weak squares they have left behind.

Be aware that the less responsibility you take on the more flexible your position is.

Black now chops some wood so the responsibility is shared amongst fewer pieces.
With each exchange the work load of the remaining White pieces increases.

Also the g6 Bishop needs a flight square, it's forced.
Black does not mind making forced moves. They are the easiest to play.

10...Nd7 11.Qe2 Nxe5 12.dxe5 h5 13.g5










Look at that.
Black has a very comfortable position and it was all White's doing.
Black develops and waits for more White ideas to improve out position.

13...Bc5 14.Bd2










And the ideas keep coming, now a sacrifice on c2. What happens if Black takes it?
The Bishop on c2 is unprotected but there is no way White can profit from this.
(14...Bxc2 15.Rc1 Bf5 16.Bxe6 Bxf7+ and 17...Bxe6.) OK take the pawn.

14...Bc2 15.g6










More tricks but Black can simply take it. Two pawns up and all Black
is doing is making legal moves. White is doing all the work.

15...Bxg6 16.Rg1










Offering a third pawn. Take it.

Not at all. If the responsibility is getting too much then Black will shed some of the load.

16...Qxh4 17.Bxe6 fxe6










White's determination to do something has lost the game.

The intended 18.Rxg6 is answered by 18...Qh1+ 19.Qf1 Qe4+ and 20...Qxg6.
White resigned. Here is the full game.


[Click here to replay the game]
S.Lalic - K.Arkell

1.e4 c6 2.d4 d5 3.Nd2 dxe4 4.Nxe4 Nd7 5.Nf3 Ngf6 6.Nxf6+ Nxf6 7.Ne5 Bf5 8.Bc4 e6 9.g4 Bg6 10.h4 Nd7 11.Qe2 Nxe5 12.dxe5 h5 13.g5 Bc5 14.Bd2 Bxc2 15.g6 Bxg6 16.Rg1 Qxh4 17.Bxe6 fxe6


See how easy that was for Black.

OK you lot, now get out there and Do Nothing.


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