Chess Edinburgh lewischessmen2-75h 

Chandler Cornered

1st Chess Scotland International Open Challenge


1st Chess Scotland International Open Chess Challenge
23rd & 24th May and the 6th & 7th June 2009
Venue: Edinburgh Chess Club 1 Alva Street.

An 8 round FIDE rated Swiss supported by the
Scottish Junior Chess Association Educational Trust (SJCAET)

The final placings.

Andrew Greet IM 7
John McBride 5
Clement Sreeves 5
Andrew McClement 5
Andrew Burnett 5
Edward Ferry 4
Chris Sykes 4
Andrew Green 4
William Hulme 4
Miroslav Plchot 4
Michael Timms 4
Jonathan Scott 4
Graeme Kafka 4
Shavan Murdochy 3
Gavin Saxton 3
Andrew McHarg 3
Ali Roy 3
Nigel Chapman 2
John Dearie 0

Rhian Hughes(2) & Dave Archibald(1) stepped in to keep the players numbers even.

Prizes Prizes Prizes OH Boy Prizes

1st Andrew Greet 7.5/8 200
2nd Clement Sreeves 5/8 100
3rd Andrew McClement 5/8 1 year ICC membership
Ties were sorted out by tie break
1st U21 Clement Sreeves 5/8 50 and free entry to Scottish Championship
2nd U21 Andrew McClement 5/8 30

Best FIDE rated Andrew McClement 50
Best Unrated Miroslav Plchot 6 month ICC membership
Giantkilling Jonathan Scott 6 month ICC membership



Andrew Greet receiving his prize from Jonathan Grant.

Here is the list of entrants in Surname alphabetical order.

A.Burnett
N.Chapman
J.Dearie
E.Ferry
A.Green
A.Greet
W.Hulme
G.Kafka
J.McBride
A.McClement
A.McHarg
S.Murdochy
M.Plchot
A.Roy
G.Saxton
J.Scott
C.Sreeves
C.Sykes
M.Timms

Same players, same crieria, this time with Christian names.

A.Burnett
A.Green
A.Greet
A.McClement
A.McHarg
A.Roy
C.Sreeves
C.Sykes
E.Ferry
G.Kafka
G.Saxton
J.McBride
J.Scott
J.Dearie
M.Plchot
M.Timms
N.Chapman
S.Murdochy
W.Hulme

That's interesting, Andrew Burnett tops both lists.
Here is a list in order of date of birth...

(CHANDLER!!!!!!.....Ed).

OK. Let's have a look a few games.
G.Kafka v J.Scott
Exchange Lopez with Black sending a cheeky Bishop into
the heart of the White camp and getting him into bother.

Nice try here by Scott. White is on top with a very pleasant
position and no hint of counter play for Black.
What do you do? Black to play.










Cling on hoping for an error?
White's position is that enjoyable that is can
hold an error or two and still win.

Wait for a chance to set a trap?
There is not much chance of a trap appearing on the horizon.

There is a trick in the position

Black throws the runes at the feet of Caissa and offers up the Bishop.
She smiles but walks the other way.

Black played 19...C5 to get the Rook off the back rank
then 20.Rxc5 Bxe4 21.fxe4 Nxe4.










Kafka would have appreciated the attempt but refused
to fall on his sword with 22.Nxe4 Rd1 mate. Here is the game.



[Click here to replay the game]
G.Kafka - J.Scott

1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 a6 4.Bxc6 dxc6 5.0-0 f6 6.d4 Bg4 7.dxe5 Qxd1 8.Rxd1 fxe5 9.Rd3 Bd6 10.Be3 Nf6 11.Nfd2 Be2 12.Rb3 0-0-0 13.f3 b5 14.Kf2 Bd1 15.Na3 Bxa3 16.Rxa3 Bxc2 17.Rc1 Bd3 18.Rxa6 Rhf8 19.Kg1 c5 20.Rxc5 Bxe4 21.fxe4 Nxe4 22.Ra8+ Kb7 23.Rxd8




Rhian Hughes v Graeme Kafka playing out their Rd.8 draw.

G.Saxton v R.Hughes gave us a Blackmar Diemer Gambit.
White went for a quick attack on f7. In hindsight, where the clever people stay,
it was better to 0-0-0 and then get the attack going.

In the game Black used the fact that the White King was naked on the
Kingside to bring off the Queens bravely steeping into a discovered check.


[Click here to replay the game]
G.Saxton - R.Hughes

1.e4 d5 2.d4 dxe4 3.Nc3 Nf6 4.f3 exf3 5.Nxf3 Bg4 6.h3 Bh5 7.g4 Bg6 8.Ne5 Nbd7 9.Nxg6 hxg6 10.g5 Nh5 11.Qf3 c6 12.Bc4 e6 13.0-0 Qe7 14.Bd2 Nb6 15.Bb3 Qc7 16.Ne4 Nc8 17.Rae1 Nd6 18.Bxe6 fxe6 19.Nc5 Nf5 20.Nxe6 Qg3+ 21.Qxg3 Nhxg3 22.Nc7+ Kd7 23.Nxa8 Nxf1 24.Rxf1 Bd6 25.h4 Rxh4 26.c3 Rh8




Clement Sreeves. Behind him is a smiling Craig Pritchett who has
just picked Clement's pocket and nicked his prize money.

Chris.Sykes v Andrew Burnett Chris always pulls me up.
"You never show any of my wins, just my losses."

It's true.
But the last time Chris won a game computers had not been invented.
I have a score sheet with a Chris win, it's written in Latin.

He could have broken his duck here though, he was close.


[Click here to replay the game]
C.Sykes - A.Burnett

1.d4 c5 2.c3 d5 3.Nf3 Nc6 4.Bf4 Nf6 5.e3 Qb6 6.Qb3 c4 7.Qxb6 axb6 8.Na3 Ra5 9.Bc7 Nd7 10.e4 e6 11.exd5 exd5 12.Nc2 Ra6 13.Be2 Nf6 14.0-0 Be6 15.Nd2 Kd7 16.Bg3 h5 17.b3 Bf5 18.Ne3 Bd3 19.Bxd3 cxd3 20.f3 Ba3 21.Rab1 h4 22.Be5 Ne7 23.Bxf6 gxf6 24.b4 b5 25.Ng4 Ng6 26.g3 hxg3 27.hxg3 f5 28.Nf2 f4 29.Nxd3 fxg3 30.Nc5+ Kd8 31.Nxa6 Nf4 32.Rfe1 Rh2 33.Re5 Nh3+ 34.Kf1 g2+



John Dearie and helper. John, who is blind, deaf and dumb was a bit out of his depth here.
His score does not reflect that every game was fought down to the wire.

Last game is John McBride v Edward Ferry An interesting hard fought
encounter. It could have produced a few attractive mates if White had played 35.Rd6.
35.Nd7 was good enough but it did allow Black to have some hope with a passed f-pawn.


[Click here to replay the game]
J.McBride - E.Ferry

1.d4 d5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.c4 c6 4.cxd5 cxd5 5.Nc3 Nc6 6.Bf4 e6 7.e3 Bd6 8.Bxd6 Qxd6 9.a3 0-0 10.Bd3 Bd7 11.0-0 Rac8 12.Rc1 Na5 13.Ne5 a6 14.f4 g6 15.Rf3 Nc4 16.Bxc4 dxc4 17.g4 Bc6 18.Rg3 b5 19.h4 Ne4 20.Nxe4 Bxe4 21.g5 Bf5 22.h5 c3 23.bxc3 Qxa3 24.Nd7 Rfd8 25.Nf6+ Kg7 26.e4 Rxd4 27.Qxd4 Qxc1+ 28.Kh2 Qc2+ 29.Rg2 Qxc3 30.Qxc3 Rxc3 31.exf5 gxf5 32.h6+ Kg6 33.Rd2 Rc8 34.Kg3 e5 35.Nd7 exf4+ 36.Kh4 f6 37.Rd6 Kf7 38.Nxf6 f3 39.Nxh7 f2 40.g6+ Ke7 41.Rd1 Rc4+ 42.Kh5 Rg4 43.Rf1 Rg2 44.g7 Kf7 45.Ng5+ Kg8 46.Kg6




These two, Andrew Green & Andrew McClement were the last to finish.

You can get all the games, more pictures and all the prize winners details from the website:

1st Chess Scotland International Open Challenge


And after it was all over it was off to the pub to analyse the games.


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